Gentbrugse Meersen, Gentbrugge

Gentbrugse Meersen, Gentbrugge

2020
EvoltaProjectsGentbrugse Meersen, Gentbrugge
Client
Farys
Location
Gentbrugge
Architect
Public Space Team

Construction of a water-resistant sports park in a meander area

New sports cluster provides resident of Ghent with 9.4 more hectares of sporting fun

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Volvo Cars, Ghent

Volvo Cars, Ghent

2020
EvoltaProjectsVolvo Cars, Ghent
Client
Volvo Cars
Location
Ghent
Architect
Consultancy Services Team

Supporting logistics transformation for the first all-electric Volvo

Optimum goods flows get XC40 Recharge off to a flying start

By 2025, Volvo Cars aims to reduce its carbon footprint per car by 40 percent. So the car manufacturer is fully committed to electric and hybrid. Our team Consultancy services supported the factory in Ghent with the start-up of a new production line for the fully electric XC40 Recharge – the first fully electric Volvo.

Our on-site engineer optimized together with his temporary colleagues from ‘Plant Supply Chain Engineering’ the new flow of goods to the assembly line.

During the intensive preparation period, every step in the supply process was carefully coordinated: the right packaging for each piece, an uninterrupted flow from trailer to the line without intermediate stocks, combined transports by train for different packaging types, and cyclic delivery according to a standard model. Every detail was crucial – the slightest variation would disrupt the process.

Meanwhile, the production of the Volvo XC40 Recharge is running smoothly, and the orders keep coming.

Residential care centre A. Lacourt, Ostend

Residential care centre A. Lacourt, Ostend

2019
EvoltaProjectsResidential care centre A. Lacourt, Ostend
Client
Ostend Social Home
Location
Ostend
Architect
People in Development Team

Expansion of residential care centre by 60 residential units

A renovation with regard for the needs of current and new residents

Following the new spatial planning for the residential care centre De Boarebreker site, the Ostend Social Home decided to ​expand residential care centre A. Lacourt by 60 rooms.​

In order to implement the expansion without having to evacuate the residents, we chose to keep the central block and the existing residential block B in their entirety. The day centre area, cafeteria and part of residential block A were demolished to make way for the ambitious expansion.

New cafeteria the priority

Immediately after the demolition works, we started the construction of a new cafeteria space, owing to its important social function. Thanks to a construction system with a steel structure and aluminium-fleece façade, the residents quickly regained a place to have a coffee with their friends, family and acquaintances.

Extra indoor and outdoor space

All the wards were also given a spacious living room with an open kitchen for eating, watching television, for entertainment, you name it. Each of the living rooms was equipped with an outdoor balcony on which to enjoy the sunlight and contact with the enclosed garden on sunny days. The nursing stations connect directly to the living rooms.

Most of the hallways end at a small rest area overlooking the enclosed garden or surrounding public space, so they are naturally lit and residents can experience sun and outdoor activity at any time. In the enclosed garden itself, residents can socialise with their companions on the cafeteria terrace, or stroll among various green spaces.

Most of the new façade area, like the existing facade, consists of insulated façade plaster with a Belgian blue limestone plinth surrounding the building. And the aluminium joinery also follows the existing windows in colour choice and layout, such that the new and existing parts of the building visibly form a single whole.

Hertstraat, Ghent

Hertstraat, Ghent

2023
EvoltaProjectsHertstraat, Ghent
Client
Ghent City Council
Location
Ghent
Architect
Public Space Team

Greening and depaving of 6 streets in Ghent

Innovative urban development for a climate-robust city

Between the Muinkschelde River and King Albert I Park lies a piece of Ghent with a special history. For centuries, the Muinkmeersen remained a marshy area within the city walls where the monks of St. Peter’s Abbey bleached linen, among other things. In 1851, part of it was set up as a zoo, after which the city bought the land and developed it as a combination of an urban park, avenues with mansions and avenues with workmen’s houses. The neighbourhood became an example of urban development innovation from the early 20th century.

One hundred years later, the City of Ghent wants to reclaim the historic district as an example of urban development innovation. Not in response to population growth and housing a growing working class this time, but rather to prepare the city for tomorrow’s challenges. Our Public Spaces team is responsible for the entire study assignment, from study to design, tendering and supervision of the works.

Climate change is at the top of the City of Ghent’s list of challenges. Periods of extreme heat and heavy rainfall are becoming more frequent, as the city’s many pavements create an urban heat island effect. The design of the Hertstraat cluster therefore maximises the use of depaving. This frees up space for façade gardens up to 2 metres (!) wide, tree basins and wadis. There is maximum possibility for water infiltration in the many green areas and permeable pavements. The greenery consists of a combination of robust and climate-resistant plant species that thrive in dry and temporarily wet soils. The innovative design allows current and future residents to find a place amongst the greenery in the city centre.

The streets will be redesigned as a residential area – as living streets with a strong residential function. This should not only slow down the speed of traffic, but also create a shared space with seating and play incentives. A place where residents can meet up.

A less visible aspect, but a significant part of the project, is the construction of sewers. Close to the Lower Scheldt and within the highly urbanised context of Ghent, this is inevitably a challenge.

Such a drastic change requires support. For this reason, we developed an extensive participation and communication process, where local residents could have a seat at the design tables to shape their street with us.

Both the climate-resilient design and strong participatory process earned bronze at the 2020 VLARIO Innovation Award ceremony.

ArcelorMittal, Ghent

ArcelorMittal, Ghent

2016
EvoltaProjectsArcelorMittal, Ghent
Client
ArcelorMittal
Location
Ghent
Architect
Consultancy Services Team

Renovation for final rolling group at Ghent hot-rolling mill

ArcelorMittal saves automotive sector tons of CO2 with ultra-thin steel

With increasing pressure on the automotive industry to reduce CO2 emissions from cars, demand is growing for thinner steel plates with higher strength and good formability. The Consultancy Services Team helped ArcelorMittal with the step-by-step introduction of a new final rolling group that can roll 36mm slabs into steel sheets with final thicknesses of between 1.25 and 13mm.

Our on-site consultant was responsible for drafting the specifications, selecting and negotiating with suppliers, monitoring the engineering and communications, project planning and training the production crews.

Stronger steel types require greater rolling forces in the hot-rolling mill, and thus modification of existing rolling machines. ArcelorMittal’s new final rolling line had to meet several requirements: higher rolling forces, primarily in the first two rolling mills, higher drive torques and power of the rolling machines, and better control of the rolling process to ensure continued quality. That means faster basic automation and additional actuators to improve rollability.

Step by step over four years, a new final rolling group with seven coupled rolling machines was built. For 2014, new main engines were installed for four rolling machines. In November 2014, the main engine and gearboxes for the first rolling machine were replaced, and one year later the main engine for the sixth machine had its turn. The two middle rolling machines were also rebuilt, and in November 2016, their roller power was increased. In that same year, we dismantled the first two old rolling machines, and new rolling line was put into use.

WATT Revive, Ghent

WATT Revive, Ghent

2019
EvoltaProjectsWATT Revive, Ghent
Client
Revive
Location
Ghent
Architect
Public Space Team

Redeveloping an abandoned industrial site into a vibrant residential and working neighbourhood

A successful redevelopment with (an ecological) character

Along with project developer Revive and partners KRAS architects, Establis, Boydens and Fris in het Landschap, we transformed one of Ghent’s dirtiest spots into one of its greenest. A sustainable living and working neighbourhood in the heart of the city with no fewer than 14 Nearly Zero-Energy (NZE) homes and 59 NZE apartments, room for offices and commercial spaces, and a 2,000 m² public garden.
Our Public Spaces team helped translate the master plan into some compelling designs, implementation files and the final redevelopment.

High-quality motor oil based on rapeseed had been produced at the old Elektrion site since 1926, leading to serious soil contamination up to 7 metres deep. Initially, the area was remediated and a master plan and visual quality plan were prepared.

New life was breathed into the existing office building and the remaining structure of the historic sheds by renovating, remodelling and repurposing them into a business centre with light-filled, well-insulated office spaces, attached to a co-working space. Authentic elements were restored to their former glory as far as possible.

In addition to the office development, two multi-family homes were erected in white brick as accent buildings on the site. Just like all the other homes and apartments, they were designed in accordance with NZE standards and connected to the site’s Borehole Thermal Energy Storage (BTES) system.

The project paid close attention to the needs of the residents. The site was upgraded to a semi-public space and made accessible to the neighbourhood. In addition, a ‘neighbourhood barn’ was provided, where residents and neighbours can organise activities. We designed the community garden and created some new soft connections between Pieter Colpaertsteeg and the Groene Vallei for pedestrians and cyclists. The neighbourhood is car-free today and accessible only to emergency vehicles and refuse services.

The landscape design puts maximum emphasis on a natural and casual atmosphere. The indoor garden is a place where people can meet, relax and pick something nice from the berry bushes on the park edges or from the vegetable garden trays. We designed a rolling park landscape, which contrasts nicely with the strong lines of the surrounding architecture. The diversified vegetation and elevation changes keep the garden interesting throughout the various seasons, providing healthy biodiversity.

This project illustrates our way of working in a complex urban environment, and shows how, in consultation with all the services, we can provide a high-quality, contemporary response to the urban challenges of today and tomorrow.

Cycleway F1, Zemst

Cycleway F1, Zemst

2019
EvoltaProjectsCycleway F1, Zemst
Client
Municipality of Zemst & Agentschap Wegen en Verkeer
Location
Zemst
Architect
Sustainable Mobility Team

Construction of cycleways and safe cycle crossing

Zemst is investing in a smooth and safe cycle connection to Mechelen

When the municipality of Zemst wanted to provide a cycleway along the busy Brusselsesteenweg (N1), we were responsible for the entire study task – from sketch design to tendering and coordination of the works.

The project consisted of two parts: the reconstruction of the cycle lanes between Heidestraat and Zemstbaan, and a cycle crossing or bypass to Zemstsesteenweg along the Antwerp-Brussels railroad line.

Een veilige boulevard en authentieke keiklinkers

Both projects fit seamlessly with the new design for the junction of Brusselsesteenweg and Zemstbaan in Mechelen. We carefully coordinated the works to minimise traffic disruption on the route.

In the design of the new cycle lane, we used warning strips and green belts to separate the cycle lanes from the roadway as far as possible. The existing cycle lanes were raised and rebuilt in red asphalt for the same reason.

Meanwhile, to the north of the cycleway, we are working on tendering for a follow-on route up to Steenmolenstraat, which connects the cycleway to Mechelen station.

Residential care center Zilverbos, Zelzate

Residential care center Zilverbos, Zelzate

2016
EvoltaProjectsResidential care center Zilverbos, Zelzate
Client
OCMW Zelzate
Location
Zelzate
Architect
Team Human in development

Integrated residential care center with a focus on comfort and a feeling of home

OCMW Zelzate focuses on humanity, domesticity and social integration

At the request of OCMW Zelzate, we built a  residential care center with 120 permanent residential units and 5 short-term residential units. The complex is arranged for 3 departments, with 3 living groups of about 14 residents in each department.

Central to this project were the residents, the homeliness of the site, the integration of the residential care center in the environment, and the limitation of exploitation and operating costs. Our team was responsible for the design, stability studies, building technology, EPB reporting and environmental planning.

Homely design with a view of the surroundings

We designed the residential care center in Zelzate as a central core with four wings, which fan out as much as possible from the core to improve the view from the rooms. In addition to comfortable single rooms and communal terraces on three levels in the three wings, we provided a reception, communal meeting room, administrative areas, kitchen and staff room on the ground floor. Each living group was also given a common living room and dining room with a view of the surroundings. The corridors were visually shortened with offsets and niches to create a homely feel.

Warm, durable materials

The facade was made of glued bricks and aluminium exterior joinery, for reasons of sustainability and to reduce (maintenance) costs. We finished the floors of the rooms with a heterogeneous plastic with a wood pattern for a warm, homely feeling. One of the room walls was each time finished with textured wallpaper in an accent colour, the rest was painted in a light colour. The corridors were given a synthetic floor and handrails along both sides.

Modern techniques

The rooms are heated with radiators, all other rooms are equipped with floor heating. Furthermore, the living areas are equipped with a cooling system, all rooms are ventilated according to ventilation type D – balanced ventilation with heat recovery – and each room has its own shower, fed by a circulation network and heated by a solar water heater on the roof of the residential care centre. To save energy, the lighting in the common areas and bathrooms is controlled by motion sensors. Of course, all rooms are also equipped with a care call system with touchscreen and radio.

Accessible, green environment

The domain around the residential care center has been designed as a semi-public space, so that the site – and therefore also its residents – remain integrated into the daily life of the area. For example, the paths were connected to public (pedestrian) roads to encourage spontaneous encounters. We are fully committed to circular walking routes on a flat, accessible surface, and also provided an enclosed garden for residents with dementia, which connects to the dementia department on the ground floor. We also provided parking space for urgent services near the main entrance, a zone for short-term parking, and a terrace at the cafeteria.

For the green design, we aimed for a maintenance-friendly concept, with lavender, roses and hydrangeas close to the terraces and extensively managed grass areas around the paths. Various elements from the surrounding park zone, such as trees and hedge structures, are reflected in the terrace of the cafeteria, which extends the interplay of lines of the architecture inside to the outside.